Curatorial Projects
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Beinhaus Halstatt, by Kevin Kirwan, 2016.

Beinhaus Halstatt, by Kevin Kirwan, 2016.

DEEPS REMOVED is an eight video installation looking at the relationship between remains and place. The work centres on a two-part film, which documents an event that happened on the upper lake at Glendalough in sight of St.Kevin’s bed. The other films in this exhibition are dreamlike portrayals of catacombs, churches, crypts and abbeys in Portugal and Austria. Other fleeting moments from film history are employed to contemplate what remains of people in a place.

http://kevinkirwan.info

Sound for the exhibition was created by Three Nuns (Cillian Pete)

Clothes Pile, by Aleana Egan, 2017.

Clothes Pile, by Aleana Egan, 2017.

Illuminations is delighted to host a retrospective of the work of Aleana Egan.

Aleana Egan’s art is predominantly intuitive and subjective; she uses simple materials, assembled or barely transformed, to create enigmatic works that have a restrained tone and structure. She groups these pieces into installations that are oddly ambivalent; on the one hand she draws our attention to the way things look, how they settle, sag, curve, or hang; on the other, her forms and shapes act as traces or memories, and as a tentative articulation of shifting responses to remembered places or everyday moments. Gaps and absences are at the heart of what Egan does, and this is what makes her work a little puzzling. Similarly, her frequent literary and historical allusions, which are never explained, are reticent and elliptic.

www.kerlingallery.com

These Circular Ruins, by Marie Farrington, 2016.

These Circular Ruins, by Marie Farrington, 2016.

Marie Farrington’s work in These Circular Ruins takes as its premise a number of myths and legends entwined within the history of Maynooth University. The film, sculpture and drawing works think through the dichotomous nature of symbols and legends, as well as the impact of literature and language on the construction of history and myth.

YU The Lost Country, by Dragana Jurisic, 2016.

YU The Lost Country, by Dragana Jurisic, 2016.

YU The Lost Country is a portrait of the countries, which make up what once was Yugoslavia. Jurisic’s work explores her lost homeland, its history and new reality. Her photography manages to convey a sense of displacement, reflecting the artist’s emotional connection as an exile, and of a country’s identity, which has been forced into silence.

www.draganajurisic.com

Views, by Niamh O'Malley, 2017.

Views, by Niamh O'Malley, 2017.

Niamh O’Malley uses video, drawing, painting and sculpture, to examine ways in which we try to access the world through images. Her works often act as filters and invite us to enter the spaces between objects and places and our ideas of them. This exhibition includes a selection of works by O’Malley which function as previews or documents of films that are more typically installed in large exhibition formats. In this situation they are screened within the existing display vitrines to provide an insight into her practice over recent years.

www.niamhomalley.com

For the Birds, For the Birds, by Sean Lynch, 2017.

For the Birds, For the Birds, by Sean Lynch, 2017.

Sean Lynch’s exhibition at the Illuminations gallery considers the medieval myth of Buile Suibhne, an ongoing topic in his investigations of how folklore and history can be liberally inherited and adopted for contemporary life. The story of Suibhne, or Sweeney, has long been a subject for creative invention – figures such as Seamus Heaney and Joan Jonas have all considered the tale of the frenzied mad king, exiled from his land following the introduction of a Christian hierarchy into Ireland. Cursed to be half man, half bird, Sweeney schizophrenically roams throughout the island and beyond. 

http://www.seanlynchinfo.com/

Beinhaus Halstatt, by Kevin Kirwan, 2016.

DEEPS REMOVED is an eight video installation looking at the relationship between remains and place. The work centres on a two-part film, which documents an event that happened on the upper lake at Glendalough in sight of St.Kevin’s bed. The other films in this exhibition are dreamlike portrayals of catacombs, churches, crypts and abbeys in Portugal and Austria. Other fleeting moments from film history are employed to contemplate what remains of people in a place.

http://kevinkirwan.info

Sound for the exhibition was created by Three Nuns (Cillian Pete)

Clothes Pile, by Aleana Egan, 2017.

Illuminations is delighted to host a retrospective of the work of Aleana Egan.

Aleana Egan’s art is predominantly intuitive and subjective; she uses simple materials, assembled or barely transformed, to create enigmatic works that have a restrained tone and structure. She groups these pieces into installations that are oddly ambivalent; on the one hand she draws our attention to the way things look, how they settle, sag, curve, or hang; on the other, her forms and shapes act as traces or memories, and as a tentative articulation of shifting responses to remembered places or everyday moments. Gaps and absences are at the heart of what Egan does, and this is what makes her work a little puzzling. Similarly, her frequent literary and historical allusions, which are never explained, are reticent and elliptic.

www.kerlingallery.com

These Circular Ruins, by Marie Farrington, 2016.

Marie Farrington’s work in These Circular Ruins takes as its premise a number of myths and legends entwined within the history of Maynooth University. The film, sculpture and drawing works think through the dichotomous nature of symbols and legends, as well as the impact of literature and language on the construction of history and myth.

YU The Lost Country, by Dragana Jurisic, 2016.

YU The Lost Country is a portrait of the countries, which make up what once was Yugoslavia. Jurisic’s work explores her lost homeland, its history and new reality. Her photography manages to convey a sense of displacement, reflecting the artist’s emotional connection as an exile, and of a country’s identity, which has been forced into silence.

www.draganajurisic.com

Views, by Niamh O'Malley, 2017.

Niamh O’Malley uses video, drawing, painting and sculpture, to examine ways in which we try to access the world through images. Her works often act as filters and invite us to enter the spaces between objects and places and our ideas of them. This exhibition includes a selection of works by O’Malley which function as previews or documents of films that are more typically installed in large exhibition formats. In this situation they are screened within the existing display vitrines to provide an insight into her practice over recent years.

www.niamhomalley.com

For the Birds, For the Birds, by Sean Lynch, 2017.

Sean Lynch’s exhibition at the Illuminations gallery considers the medieval myth of Buile Suibhne, an ongoing topic in his investigations of how folklore and history can be liberally inherited and adopted for contemporary life. The story of Suibhne, or Sweeney, has long been a subject for creative invention – figures such as Seamus Heaney and Joan Jonas have all considered the tale of the frenzied mad king, exiled from his land following the introduction of a Christian hierarchy into Ireland. Cursed to be half man, half bird, Sweeney schizophrenically roams throughout the island and beyond. 

http://www.seanlynchinfo.com/

Beinhaus Halstatt, by Kevin Kirwan, 2016.
Clothes Pile, by Aleana Egan, 2017.
These Circular Ruins, by Marie Farrington, 2016.
YU The Lost Country, by Dragana Jurisic, 2016.
Views, by Niamh O'Malley, 2017.
For the Birds, For the Birds, by Sean Lynch, 2017.